Essential Mavericks Apps

Essential Mavericks Apps

In the near future I'll be transitioning from Apple's OS X Mountain Lion to Mavericks. Every year, in the months before an operating system update, I attempt to pare my apps down to just those essential applications that I find indispensable. My housekeeping for this update is already complete. Here's my 'Essential Mavericks Apps' list.

Essential Mavericks Apps for Words

  • Calibre
  • Clyppan
  • iBooks
  • iBooks Author (32)1
  • Kaleidoscope
  • Liquid
  • Marked
  • Pages
  • PDFpenPro
  • PopChar
  • Scapple
  • Scrivener (32)
  • Sigil
  • Smultron
  • TextExpander
  • TextSoap
  • TypeMetal
  • Ulysses III

Essential Mavericks Apps for Images

  • Aperture
  • Color Schemer Studio (32)
  • Ember
  • Fontcase
  • Graphic Converter
  • Keynote
  • Logoist
  • Napkin
  • OmniGraffle Professional
  • Pixelmator
  • Pochade
  • Sketch
  • VueScan
  • xScope

Essential Mavericks Apps for Data

  • Calca
  • Contacts
  • DropDMG
  • Entropy
  • Espionage
  • Export Address Book
  • iCloud Keychain
  • InfoClick (32)
  • MacFamilyTree
  • Mactracker
  • Numbers
  • PCalc (32)
  • Sequel Pro
  • Soulver

Essential Mavericks Apps for Scheduling

  • 2Do
  • BusyCal
  • Fantastical

Essential Mavericks Apps for Audio

  • Audio Hijack Pro (32)
  • iTunes
  • Triumph
  • TwistedWave

Essential Mavericks Apps for Video

  • iMovie
  • QuickTime Player
  • ScreenFlow
  • Smart Converter Pro
  • Toast (32)

Essential Mavericks Apps for the Web

  • 1Password
  • Dropbox (32)
  • Mail
  • MailMate (32)
  • MAMP PRO
  • Maps
  • Messages
  • ReadKit
  • Safari
  • Skype (32)
  • SpamSieve
  • Transmit
  • Tweetbot

Essential Mavericks Apps for Backup

  • BackBlaze
  • Carbon Copy Cloner
  • Time Machine

Essential Mavericks Utility Apps

  • Alfred
  • AppDelete
  • Bartender
  • Default Folder X
  • Moom
  • Name Mangler
  • Pastebot Sync
  • PopClip
  • Printopia

Q: Have you changed any of the apps you recommended for OS X Mountain Lion?
A: I'm always dismayed by the number of changes I make to my workflow from year to year. In previous years many readers told me that dropping Adobe's Creative Suite and then Microsoft's Office apps were noteworthy changes. I wonder if dropping most Google apps and services will be perceived as a similar milestone? I've switched from Gmail to FastMail. I've replaced Google Chrome with Safari. Google Earth has given way to OS X's Maps. I'm searching with Siri or even Bing rather than Google. I've been similarly brutal with Google's iOS apps. I'll undoubtedly be asked, "Why have you gone negative on Google?" My bottom line is that, from my vantage, Google has become greedier, less friendly (killing services) and possibly even a little sinister. I favour Apple's customer/client paradigms over those of Google. My application developer bias is probably obvious, I prefer small(er), OS X and iOS Indie developers; a software development paradigm obscurely akin to the organic family farm versus the industrial food corporation archetype.

As usual, there are dozens of previously purchased apps that I'm no longer using. Many of the changes are related to my still evolving adoption of plain text for a lot of what I do.

Q: That's quite a long list, which apps do you use most often?
A: My almost always open apps are:

Caution: Although these are the apps I intend to use, a few may not be Mavericks compatible immediately after the Mavericks launch.

  1. (32) highlights 32 Bit apps, the vast majority of my essential Mavericks apps are 64 Bit.

Comments

  1. Alan Sandercock says:

    Hi there,
    Love your blog and I’ve been reading it for a while. Just one comment on the list above for now. What about checking out aText as a replacement for Text Expander considering your bias is towards small companies? I am evaluating both products and am certain liking the fact that I can buy aText for $5 instead of paying something like 7 times that amount for Text Expander.

  2. I haven’t tested aText, but it looks impressive. I started using TextExpander before Peter Maurer sold it to Smile Software. Also, I sync my OS X snippets with my iPad and iPhone. TextExpander has become a quasi standard on iOS. Thanks for your recommendation Alan.