Texts App Review

Texts app icon

Texts App Introduction

Do you write with a markdown application? If not, does your reticence have anything to do with learning markdown syntax? What if you could instantly enjoy all the benefits of markdown without having to learn anything new? If you’ve followed my flighty journey with OS X markdown apps, you know that I’ve, mostly, been a Byword guy. That’s no longer the case, I’ve recently switched from Byword to Texts. This won’t be a Texts app review, in the traditional sense, it’s a feature overview.

All The Benefits Of Markdown
Without Having To Learn Anything New

My Texts app window is tack-sharp on my retina display. Unfortunately, my resized screen capture (below) doesn’t do the app justice. When you test the demo for yourself, you’ll dig the clean display.

Texts app window

Texts App Features Overview

Texts app:

  • displays rich text while you’re writing, but automatically stores your document as markdown-formatted, plain text
  • displays bold & italicized text, headings, bulleted lists, ordered lists, quotations, images, links, tables, code, math formulae, footnotes, bibliography and citations, as rich text
  • dynamically zooms in and zooms out for easy reading on any screen
  • has multiple display themes you can customize
  • seems to work nicely with PopClip, TextExpander and Moom
  • has a spell checking option
  • moves paragraphs, up, down and sideways with ease
  • makes it very easy to create tables
  • has an option to display word or character counts
  • easily copies selected text as HTML or plain text
  • separates your content from its formatting
  • makes it easy to create well-structured documents
  • automatically saves documents as plain text with an .md file extension, or whichever extension you prefer
  • uses Pandoc, not MultiMarkdown for document conversion
  • exports clean HTML5, ePub, PDF or Word (DOCX)
  • has sophisticated file export templates
  • saves to local mac folders or iCloud drive
  • doesn’t attempt to be a file management application
  • doesn’t attempt to be a one-stop blog editor/publisher
  • has a tiny footprint (3.8 MB, not including Pandoc)
  • has a very responsive developer

Using Texts app is effortless, there’s no syntax to remember and when you save, your document is automatically stored in a plain text, file format that will be accessible, anytime, even many years from now, no matter which text editor your using at that time. Background: It wasn’t too long ago that I experienced a mini-nightmare trying to access some very old WordPerfect files. That’s one reason I love plain text.

My Texts App Configuration

I’ve configured Texts to:

  • disable hard wrapping of lines within paragraphs (save documents without line breaks inside paragraphs)
  • use ATX style headings (#, ##, ###, ####)
  • use a .txt extension instead of the default .md extension.

I almost always use the ‘Dark’ theme.

Blogging with Texts App

As you, probably, know Markdown-formatted plain text is often used to create blog posts, like this one. Blogo, Desk, MarsEdit and other apps attempt to do-it-all (writing and online publishing). My web host blocks access to xmlrpc.php for security reasons. Even though it’s easy to override that xmlrpc.php security option with a short .htaccess entry, I’ve chosen not to do it. My understanding is that access to xmlrpc.php is a requirement for most, if not all, of the do-it-all apps. Texts fits my simple blogging workflow perfectly:

  1. write and edit my journal entry with Texts app
  2. select text
  3. copy as HTML
  4. paste into WordPress
  5. play with SEO fields in WordPress and publish.

Byword Comment

How is any of this different than Byword?” I love Byword, but after I experienced Texts’ straightforward table creation and live preview of images, I was hooked.

Texts App Conclusion and Download

Occasionally, an Indie developer creates a gem that a lot of end users miss. I’ve concluded Texts deserves a little more love than it’s had thus far. Texts is a simple-to-use, but surprisingly powerful application; it could easily become your most used writing app. Although it may, or may not, fit your workflow, my recommendation is to give Texts an opportunity to impress. There’s a free trial, so download Texts app now. I know you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

If Texts elegant, minimalist approach doesn’t suit you, you might want to have a look at Ulysses.

I haven’t used Windows for years, but, if you do, Texts app is also available for Windows.